Did you know that burnout is a consequence of a bad career choice?

" BURN OUT "

From a survey made in USA with 2,000 respondents of 18 years old and up about the reason of probabilyties of burn out,

 

88% Have a negative tought about theyre job

65% Are easily irritated by small problems or by my co-workers

70% Feel misunderstood or unappreciated by my co-workers

90% Feel that I am achieving less than I should

95% Feel that I am not getting what I want out of my job

90% Feel that I am in the wrong organization or the wrong profession

83% I am frustrated with parts of my job

Companies are facing an employee burnout crisis

· A recent Gallup study of nearly 7,500 full-time employees found that 23 percent reported feeling burned out at work very often or always, while an additional 44 percent reported feeling burned out sometimes.

· Job burnout accounts for an estimated $125 billion to $190 billion in health-care spending each year and has been attributed to type 2 diabetes, coronary heart disease, gastrointestinal issues, high cholesterol and even death for those under the age of 45.

· Unfair treatment at work, unreasonable deadlines, unmanageable workload, lack of support from managers and the added stress from having to respond to emails and texts during off hours are primary drivers of job burnout.

Sheryl Kraft, special to CNBC.com

Companies are facing an employee burnout crisis: A recent Gallup study of nearly 7,500 full-time employees found that 23 percent of employees reported feeling burned out at work very often or always, while an additional 44 percent reported feeling burned out sometimes.

"The cost of absenteeism and turnover is enormous in most organizations," said Jim Harter, Ph.D., chief scientist of workplace management and well-being for Gallup. Aside from absenteeism, dissatisfaction and job-hopping, he says that the higher stress resulting from burnout is associated with poor physiological health.

The meltdown accounts for an estimated $125 billion to $190 billion in health-care spending each year, according to an article in the Harvard Business Review.A 2017 study in the journal PLoS One cited major health risks related to job burnout, like type 2 diabetes, coronary heart disease, gastrointestinal issues, high cholesterol and even death for those under the age of 45.

 

First coined in the 1970s by American psychologist Herbert Freudenberger, "burnout" referred to stress and exhaustion felt by those in "helping" professions — like doctors and nurses — making it tough for them to cope. And while that may still be true decades later — according to a Medscape Physician Lifestyle Survey, the rate of physician burnout climbed precipitously to 46 percent in 2015 — burnout can  affect anyone, no matter what their job.

Gallup's study found that about two-thirds of all full-time workers experienced burnout on the job. Some of the causes? Unfair treatment at work, unreasonable deadlines, unmanageable workload and lack of support from managers. Add to that the stress that comes with 24/7 access to work, through emails and texts, and expectations to respond at off-hours.

Despite awareness and well-intentioned workplaces, employee burnout continues to rise. But it's not inevitable. CNBC talks to experts on how employees can try to avoid it.

Learn your own strengths

If your job doesn't fit your skill set, it's easy to become disenfranchised and disengaged. "Workers who are truly engaged spend about four times as many hours doing what they do best every day, in comparison to doing what they don't do well," Dr. Harter said. Getting involved in activities that develop your strengths further can help you feel even more energized, confident and motivated.

Understand your weaknesses

In order to understand what you need to work on, it's important to figure out what, exactly, is holding you back. Self-assessment is essential; without it you can't even begin to grow. Can you improve your knowledge or skills? Learn new ones? Harvard UniversityCoursera, and Cornell are some of the many online resources offering leadership and management classes. "Leverage where you are to get to where you want to be by adding skills and knowledge," Harter said.

" In life, at least two choices are both important and difficult: the choice of a professional career and that of a spouse. Our success in life depends largely on it. Which is to say that a bad choice in one way or the other will have certainly unfortunate consequences on our life. "